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Shane Gibson Keynote Speaker | Social Selling | Sales Trainer | Social Media Strategy

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  • Nov 25 / 2015
  • Comments Off on #Podcast on Sales Coaching and Sales Process with Leanne Hoagland-Smith
* Sales Podcast, Sales Blog, Sales Training

#Podcast on Sales Coaching and Sales Process with Leanne Hoagland-Smith

sales-coaching-leanne-hoagland-smith

Today’s podcast interview is with Leanne Hoagland-Smith (@Coachlee) author of  “Be The Red Jacket in a sea of gray suits: The Keys to Unlocking Sales Success.” In this podcast we talk about: Sales coaching, Sales development and training, Emotional/Social Intelligence in sales, and even get into some social selling best-practices.

Here are a few links and resources from the podcast:

Talent (psychometric) assessments – http://processspecialist.com/talent-assessment.htm
How to refer me tool – How-To-Refer-Me-Tool
Ideal customer profile template – Ideal-Customer-Profile-Template

 

 

 

  • Nov 13 / 2015
  • 5
Social Selling Funnel Sales Process
* Sales Podcast, Sales Blog, Sales Training, social media, social selling

Using Thought Leadership to Fill Your Social Sales Funnel #Podcast

Today’s sales funnel and sales process has changed. Sales for many of us is now more about getting buy-in versus pitching our wares. This 15 minute sales and social selling podcast introduces the new sales funnel “The 5 Stages of Consent” and also dives into how content creation is not enough to get noticed – you need to have a thought leadership strategy to truly fill the new sales funnel.

The success strategies covered in this sales podcast include:

  • How to move your prospects from “hello” to permission to sell
  • How to establish yourself as a thought leader
  • The role content curation and creation play in sales success
  • Why content is king and connection is queen

Click the images below to enlarge the Social Selling Infographics:

The 5 Stages of Consent (The Social Sales Funnel)

Social Selling Funnel Sales Process

Thought Leadership in Social Selling Venn Diagram

Thought leadership venn diagram infographic

  • Jul 21 / 2014
  • Comments Off on How Intent Can Empower Your Sales Conversations
Sales Training Canada Intent in Conversations
Sales Articles, Sales Blog, Sales Training

How Intent Can Empower Your Sales Conversations

Sales Training Canada Intent in Conversations

Many variables can impact our chances of closing a deal, they include but are not limited to: industry, geography, financial situation of the customer, product quality, the customer mood or sentiment and a variety of other influences.

When comparing sales people within the exact same company very few things influence the level of one person’s success over the other more than the quality of conversations they have with future and existing customers.

Too often sales training is focused on telling people what to say. What we need to really focus on is how to think and have great conversations. Those people who can have great conversations rarely are thrown off-guard by customer questions, objections or complaints – they’re not afraid to hand the reigns over to the customer. There are several key competencies to being a great conversationalist. The first most important one in my opinion is a positive intent.

Before awareness, asking great questions or listening I truly believe intent comes first. It’s the pillar of your sales strategy. When you pick up the phone or step into a client meeting your intent will frame what you hear, the words you use and even your tonality, body language and pace of conversations.

An sales person answering customer inquiries could have the intent to “get an order” or “sell something from my product line.” This intent limits the customer experience in many cases and also misses larger opportunities. “Get the order” often translates to being an order taker, we ask fewer questions and the questions we ask are about driving the person to a predetermined product or service. If it’s not an ideal fit we often have to rely on hard closes, discounting and heavy objection handling. In this situation our closing ratio is low and the potential for negative customer feedback is high.

For instance if you work in sales at a an insurance company your intent could be “to sell the people one of our insurance products.” With this type of intent we will tend to ask questions that push people toward a narrow selection of products and if they don’t want that product the conversation can end quickly. This type of conversation can often degrade to a price only conversation or miss opportunities you had not considered. A more powerful intent that would build stronger relationships and create a better customer experience could be: “to guide my customers to invest in insurance products that give them peace of mind and take care of them in their times of need, now and in the future.”

This intent immediately expands our awareness, it changes the questions we will ask the customer and also will expand the product offerings we will talk about. All of a sudden we are having a conversation about where they want to retire, their 3 children that they want to take care of and what kind of legacy they want to create. We have laid the foundation for a lifetime customer. We also move the conversation to a place where it’s less price focused and more about the true underlying needs and motivations of the customer.

Positive intent is a conscious act that we need to commit to on every call and interaction. When the phone rings consciously state your intent to yourself before you answer the call. It’s a great way to focus and heighten our level of empathy and engagement on the phone (or in-person). When the our sales process starts with the intent to empower people to succeed it adds immeasurable value to the customer experience and it inevitably makes our job as a sales person more rewarding, personally and financially.

Next steps

  1. Create a statement of intent: In two sentences or less state what your intent is going to be on each and every call moving forward.
  2. Type this up, print it out and put it somewhere near your phone where you can see it and recite it before each call.
  3. Be aware over the next several days of the impact this has on your calls.
  • Jun 26 / 2014
  • Comments Off on 11:59:59 – The Will to Win
11:59:59 Jim Janz Goal Setting
Sales Blog, Sales Management Blog, Sales Training

11:59:59 – The Will to Win

11:59:59 Jim Janz Goal Setting

This weekend I watched my girlfriend’s all women’s team play in a baseball tournament. I sat on the sidelines (not the easiest thing for a guy who likes to be moving constantly) and watched them compete. They played some great ball and ended up 2nd overall in the tournament. What I want to focus on today is something their coach Chad had to say to the team.

One of the players asked what the score was. Chad’s response was “the score doesn’t matter – play like you’re behind by 5 in the last inning.” (The team was leading 12-9 at that point)

That one line resonated with me a lot. The difference between “beer-league” thinking and championship thinking lies within that one line. It’s about intensity and follow-through. It’s not about slightly exceeding the status quo (or our quota). It’s about seeing how far we can take it, competing with ourselves to win as big as we can. (For the record – they played hard until the very last play).

This lesson reminded me of a good friend and mentor of mine Jim Janz, a giant in the direct sales industry. He’s earned and still earns millions of dollars annually as a result of the sales leaders he has developed and helped become successful over the past 40+ years.

The single most important rule Jim shared with me that has helped him and his people succeed is this:

It’s not over until 11:59:59 on the final day of the month.

Success and quota attainment is not linear and it has as much to do with momentum and magnetism as it does with qualified prospects or the perfect sales process.

There is magic in 11:59:59.

Lets look at a typical scenario that I have seen hundreds of times:

A salesperson or entrepreneur sets a goal of $100,000 in sales for the month. By the 15th they are only at $19,000 in sales. At this point their attitude begins to shift and they already decide that the $100,000 is unattainable – in many cases they will also build a long list of reasons why it hasn’t happened. They begin to tell the story of why they can’t and won’t win. They say things like:

  • “The leads that marketing is delivering are duds.”
  • “The economy is really tight right now.”
  • “I don’t have time to make proactive calls – I’m too busy to look for new business.”
  • “No one else in the team is winning either – it’s tough out there.”

So on the 15th of the month they go and negotiate with their boss (or with themselves) and decide that $60,000 is a more reasonable goal. They also adjust their attitude, intensity and creativity to match that goal. Their customers can hear that lack of enthusiasm and lack urgency on the phone. At 9:30 am on the final Friday of the month they hit $62,000. They switch to thinking about the weekend, put their brain on auto-pilot and get ready for a fresh new start next month.

They tell themselves that when all that other stuff lines up (better leads, positive economics, fewer admin tasks and evidence that other people have done it) then they will be able to hit that $100,000 goal.

Then of course there are those people that don’t quit on the 15th of the month, or even at 9:30 am on the final day. The numbers don’t matter. They push for the goal.

I worked with a major Board of Trade’s sales team a number of years ago, helping them with their sales process. The sales manager has a diverse leadership style – she’s both highly empathetic and inclusive BUT you better perform if you work for her.

April is year-end for them and at 9:30 am on the final day of the month the entire team was well behind targets. She found them literally mulling about by the water cooler – telling their stories about why things had changed, why all the good prospects had already joined us, and why some people had good reasons for not renewing membership.

The manager pulled her team into their boardroom and gave them the 11:59:59 talk – it was their job to push through with the same intensity they started with month with –  and with an expectation that they can still win. She announced a celebration party that night in honor of them meeting and exceeding their quota. Each person was asked to go back and look over their top 20 prospects that still hadn’t signed yet and put together a compelling offer for them – and to continue to call and follow-up until the final hour.

Just after 6:00pm that day, not even 11:59:59 pm, her team had closed the equivalent of a month worth of business – the same day that started with them admitting defeat. It was the single biggest sales day they had on record that year.

They played like they were 5 points behind, but they played to win. Too many of us set a goal to win but will never know what we are capable of because we mentally walk off the field of business in the 4th inning.

One final lesson From Jim. Jim Janz would always tell his people that their job wasn’t to actually hit their BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal) – it was to play to win until 11:59:59 on the final day of the month. At that time they would then take an inventory of their progress, celebrate their efforts, review lessons learned and then set a new audacious goal. Failure is never final or fatal – just work hard and learn from your mistakes.

I have two questions to wrap this up:

  1. What would happen if you worked and re-worked your plan until 11:59:59 pm on the final day of the month?
  2.  What would happen if you played like you were 5 points behind regardless of how big your last sale was?
  • May 11 / 2013
  • Comments Off on Influence Marketing Book Interview with Danny Brown
Marketing and PR, Sales Blog, social media, social media podcast, social media speaker

Influence Marketing Book Interview with Danny Brown

Influence Marketing Book Podcast Interview Danny Brown

This week I had the great opportunity to interview Danny Brown on his new book co-authored with Sam Fiorella called Influence Marketing. Danny in my opinion is a Thought Leaders’ Though Leader – an awesome no BS resource for what really works in social media marketing.

The book launched yesterday globally and you can get it on Amazon in hardcover or Kindle format. According to HubSpot Danny Brown’s blog (DannyBrown.me) is the #1 Marketing Blog on the planet. Danny and I have been Tweeting and emailing each other for almost four years and we finally got to connect and do this podcast together

Here were some of the key take-aways from the podcast interview with Danny Brown:

  1. Most concepts of influencer marketing (especially through social media) are incomplete or focused on the wrong audience
  2. Good influencer marketing doesn’t start with social media gurus or big influencer, it starts with mapping out what your customer persona is and then identifying who impacts your customer buying decisions
  3. Klout and the many apps like it are great for identifying macro influencers but in many cases aren’t helpful identifying the actual micro influencers that directly impact your customer’s buying decisions
  4. 5 steps to to start doing your influence marketing right

We covered so much in this podcast that you’re just going to have to listen to it to get all the information.

Here’s a great InfoGraphic on Influence Marketing Sam and Danny just released that really demonstrates how many organizations are struggling with or don’t understand the importance of Influence Marketing  (Click here For the High Res Version):

Influence Marketing Infographic Danny Brown

 

 

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